Department of Communication
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Department of Communication

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER

COMMunity E-Newsletter

Inaugural Issue, July 2014

Words from the Chair


Welcome to the inaugural e-newsletter. We are using our department’s change to CMCI to better do what we know is important—communicating. And you can count on additional newsletters coming your way this fall and spring.

In June you received the announcement about our move to the College of Media, Communication, and Information (CMCI). In September the Board of Regents will vote on the proposal to approve new departments. As soon as this happens, faculty and staff in Communication, along with all of the newly formed departments, will be giving attention to making the college a living, functioning organization. We will be searching for a Dean, finalizing the kinds of new staff positions the college needs, setting in place faculty review and promotion procedures, figuring out the exact content for our year-long college core course, beginning to expand internship opportunities for our majors, and doing many other things. If you would like updates on how CMCI is developing or have a question you want to pose, check out the college website or contact me directly at Karen.Tracy@colorado.edu.

Sincerely,

Professor Karen Tracy
Department Chair
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In This Issue

Celebrating Bob Craig
Professor Bob Craig retired from teaching in the Department at the end of 2013.
Welcoming New Faculty Members
We welcome Jody Jahn and Ruth Hickerson, the newest members of our faculty.
Recent Faculty Accomplishments
Read about recent faculty accolades and publications.
Three Questions for Faculty
Karen Ashcraft, Pete Simonson, David Boromisza-Habashi and Jamie Skerski talk about what communication puzzles they are tackling these days.
Three Questions for Alumni
Obinna Onyeali (’09), Kell Delaney (MA ’11), and Angie White Davlyn (PhD ’12) answer questions about their careers and offer advice to recent graduates.
Organizing for Flood Relief
Read an interview with PhD student Ricardo Munoz about Boulder Relief Co., a non-profit organization our graduate students helped create after last year’s devastating flood.
Recent Graduate Student Accomplishments
Read about what our graduate students and graduate student alumni have been up to.
Celebrating Elizabeth Nakang Achulo
Elizabeth, one of the Lost Girls of Sudan, graduates from the Department of Communication!
Introducing Eta Phi
Learn about Eta Phi, the local chapter of Lambda Pi Eta (the National Communication Association honor society) from Eta Phi Vice President Joshua Chen.
Stay in touch!
Find out how you can stay in touch with us.

 



Celebrating Bob Craig


Professor Bob Craig retired from teaching in the Department at the end of 2013. 

Bob joined us in 1990 after holding teaching appointments at the American University in Beirut, Pennsylvania State University, University of Wisconsin–Madison, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Temple University. He publishes widely in a variety of scholarly books and journals and is credited as a leading figure in the field of communication theory for his research on communication as a practical discipline. He serves as series editor for the International Communication Association (ICA) handbook series and as an advisory editor for the International Encyclopedia of Communication. Bob is a fellow and past president of ICA and a distinguished scholar of the National Communication Association (NCA). He had been appointed to Professor Emeritus rank in our department. 

We are sorry that he is not around in the department as much as he used to be, and we look forward to his future research!

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Welcoming New Faculty Members


Jody Jahn (PhD ’12, University of California Santa Barbara)

Jody is our newest tenure-track assistant professor in organizational communication. Jody’s research examines organizations that operate in hazardous environments. Her work on wildland firefighting explores how members draw from safety documents (e.g., safety rules) to accomplish work. Theories of high reliability organizing and how communication constitutes organization inform her research. In the 2014-15 academic year Jody will teach an undergraduate quantitative research methods course and a graduate course called Readings in Organizational Communication.


Ruth Hickerson (PhD ’06, University of Denver)

Ruth is joining us this coming fall as a full-time Instructor. As she has been teaching courses for us since 2011 she is not entirely new to the department. Her areas of expertise are interpersonal/relational communication and language and social interaction. Ruth will be teaching undergraduate courses in interpersonal communication in the fall.

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Recent Faculty Accomplishments
 

Professor Karen Ashcraft delivered a keynote entitled, “Submission to the Rule of Excellence: Ordinary Affect and Precarious Resistance in the Work of Organization Studies,” at the ninth Organization Studies Workshop—on “Resistance, Resisting, and Resisters In and Around Organizations”—in Corfu, Greece, in May. She also co-facilitated the Bodø Graduate School of Business, University of Nordland’s 12th Qualitative Camp at Nyvågar, Lofoten Islands later that month. 

Assistant Professor Marlia Banning was interviewed on Counterpoint, a show on Radio New Zealand. The show addressed media coverage of neoliberalism, a key focus of Marlia’s book, Manufacturing Uncertainty. The interview is currently available here.

Assistant Professor David Boromisza-Habashi and doctoral candidate Rex Parks published “The Communal Function of Social Interaction on an Online Academic Newsgroup” in Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 78, No. 2, 2014, 194-212, doi:10.1080/10570314.2013.813061

Instructor Melinda Cain was a communication professor in the Semester at Sea Program, at which CU had the most students of any university on the voyage. She has a blog narrating her travels. 

Professor Bob Craig presented an invited lecture on “Grounded Practical Theory” to a conference on Practical Theory of Communication held February 10 in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Center for Applied Communication Research, Faculty of Communication, Anáhuac University, México Norte.

Professor Stan Deetz and PhD student Elizabeth Eger published a chapter, “Developing a Metatheoretical Perspective for Organizational Communication Studies” in the Sage Handbook of Organizational Communication: Advances in Theory, Research, and Methods, 3rd edition, edited by L. Putnam & D. Mumby and published by Sage.

Professor Larry Frey served as a “traveling scholar” for the Department of Communication at the University of Louisiana Monroe, giving a keynote lecture and four class presentations; and as the keynote speaker at the 36th annual Communication Studies Conference in the School of Communication Studies at James Madison University. He also presented a colloquium in the Department of Communication Studies at Louisiana State University. In addition, he co-edited the book, Teaching Communication Activism: Communication Education for Social Justice, with a foreword by Peter McLaren, published by Hampton Press.

Associate Professor Tim Kuhn published a chapter, “Knowledge and Knowing in Organizational Communication” in the Sage Handbook of Organizational Communication: Advances in Theory, Research, and Methods, 3rd edition, edited by L. Putnam & D. Mumby and published by Sage.

Lecturer Vanessa Schatz gave a guest lecture at the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic in March and worked with Brad Bernthal and his group of student attorneys who are currently advising early stage tech start-up clients. Vanessa emphasized verbal and nonverbal communication strategies to effectively convey essential information while counseling a start-up.

Associate Professor Pete Simonson will give the keynote address at the 17th International Conference on the History of Concepts at the University of Bielefeld in Germany in August. He also published “Rhetoric, Culture, Things,” a review essay in Quarterly Journal of Speech, Vol. 100, No 1, 2014, 100-125. doi:10.1080/00335630.2014.887852

Assistant Professor Leah Sprain along with Martin Carcasson and Andy Merolla published the article, “Utilizing “On Tap” Experts in Deliberative Forums: Implications for Design” in Journal of Applied Communication Research, Vol. 42, No. 2, 2014, 150-167, doi:10.1080/00909882.2013.859292

Professor Bryan Taylor co-authored with Thomas R. Lindlof “Travelling Methods: Tracing the Globalization of Qualitative Communication Research” in Romanian Journal of Communication and Public Relations, Vol. 15 No. 3, 2013. The article is available for download here.

Professor Karen Tracy received a contract from Oxford University Press for her proposed book, Identity-Work in Courts and Judicial Hearings: Disputing Who Can Marry. The book, which she expects to finish by May 2015, will appear in the Language and Law series. She also visited the University of Kansas in March to talk with a university honors seminar about her book, Challenges of Ordinary Democracy.

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Three Questions for Faculty


Professor Karen Ashcraft 

COMM: What communication issue or puzzle are you currently focusing on in your work?

KA: The primary puzzle motivating my research for the past several years is occupational segregation,” or the concentration of certain people in certain lines of work. Think about how many jobs are associated with specific gender, race, even sexual identities, for example. Occupational segregation carries major consequences for all of our lives, yielding marked differences in experience, social and economic standing, even life expectancy. I’m interested in how such associations between jobs and groups of people come about and, especially, the role that communication plays in that process.

COMM: How do you go about addressing that issue?

KA: Thus far, my research has addressed this puzzle with a focus on the evolution of professions over time. One of my projects, for example, combined archival research, interviews, and participant observation to study how commercial airline flying came to be regarded as a profession and how, if at all, social identities linked to gender, race and sexuality factored into this process.

COMM: What have you learned so far?

KA: Among my findings is that communication about work—ranging from formal organizational messaging campaigns to informal, everyday interaction among coworkers and clients to imagery widely circulated in popular culture—is far more influential in creating and transforming, not only maintaining, occupational segregation than previously thought.

I recently developed the notion of the “glass slipper” to capture how this happens: namely, how occupations themselves take on identities, how these form around alignment with and distance from certain social bodies, and how systems of privilege and disadvantage result. I am now exploring how the glass slipper acts as a “brand” that passes through society in affective circuits. By this, I mean that we are deeply affected by the social identities of occupations. All kinds of tangible work-life arrangements—wages, career paths, relations of authority and autonomy, uniforms and bodily comportment, the distribution of risk or the division of domestic duties, to name just a few—appear to hinge on surges of achievement and failure, pride and shame, belonging and misfitting, entitlement and lack thereof, made possible by the glass slipper.

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Associate Professor Pete Simonson

COMM: What communication issue or puzzle are you currently focusing on in your work?

PS: Currently, I’m giving a close look at the emergence, development, and international spread of the concept of “mass communication” from the end of World War I through the 1960s. It’s a strange and distinctively American compound term that captures both the hopes and fears about the new media of the day—especially radio and movies.

COMM: How do you go about addressing that issue?

PS: I’ve been investigating it by reading old trade publications, newspapers, and academic journals and visiting the archives of the poet and public intellectual Archibald MacLeish, the leader of the U.S. delegation to the conference that established UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

COMM: What have you learned so far?

PS: I’ve found that it developed within engineering talk and was quickly picked up by radio broadcasting executives who used it to help sell the idea of commercially supported national radio networks. In the 1930s and ’40s, it entered academic circles and came to name a new field of study still represented here on campus. It spread internationally in the 1940s and ’50s, partly through UNESCO and U.S.-sponsored development work during the Cold War, which people on the ground in Latin America and elsewhere didn’t always appreciate.

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Assistant Professor David Boromisza-Habashi 

COMM: What communication issue or puzzle are you currently focusing on in your work?

DBH: Since I had moved the United States for my graduate studies I have found the idea of public speaking fascinating. Growing up in Hungary in the 1980s and ’90s I had no idea that such a thing as public speaking was taught at universities in countries like the U.S. Neither was I aware of the enormous value U.S. Americans attributed to teaching and learning public speaking. Last year, I decided to study public speaking as a culturally specific form of communication. I am particularly interested in how individuals socialized in non-U.S. or minority groups learn and/or teach public speaking.

COMM: How do you go about addressing that issue?

DBH: As an ethnographer, I learn a lot by directly observing, and sometimes participating in, the kind of communication I am studying. In the spring of 2013 I took the undergraduate public speaking class offered in our department. Sitting in the same class with some of my students was a bit awkward, but I learned a tremendous amount about “public speaking” as a cultural ideal.

COMM: What have you learned so far?

DBH: I am at the very beginning of this project but one thing I am starting to suspect is that the ideal of public speaking is deeply rooted in U.S. American ways of thinking about the nature of the person. Take public speaking anxiety. It strikes me that the experience of such anxiety has an important role in students’ transformation from private into public persons. If this is the case, we should not be so concerned about eliminating or reducing public speaking anxiety. Instead, we should help students appreciate it as an element of an important cultural ritual.


Senior Instructor Jamie Skerski

COMM: What communication issue or puzzle are you currently focusing on in your work?

JS: I’m very interested in how communication technologies impact our humanity, identity and relationships.  Undoubtedly, we communicate more than ever via text, email, Skype, visuals, emoji – you name it. But I’m wondering if this increase in quantity diminishes the quality of human connection.

COMM: How do you go about addressing that issue?

JS: I’ve dedicated a segment in my COMM 2400: Discourse, Identity and Culture course to explore the issue of Identity & Technology. Every semester, students react so positively to this critical interrogation of technology, I’d like to develop an entire course on the topic. Growing up as “digital natives,” many of them have never known a world without keyboards and instantaneous communication.

COMM: What have you learned so far?

JS: Interestingly, electronic communication is a fantastic way to observe how gender norms are (re)produced and challenged in our society. That’s not to say that all men communicate one way, and women another – not at all – but it’s fascinating to actually see how gender is “performed” through visual and electronic language.

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Three Questions for Alumni


Obinna Onyeali (’09)

COMM: Where are you now, and what do you do?

OO: I currently work in the Office of Admissions for CU-Boulder.  I help to recruit prospective students to the university along with planning on and off-campus programs.

COMM: Can you recall a time when you thought about what you had learned about communication at CU?

OO: I think about what I learned from both my public speaking and my organizational communication courses.  This job has given me the opportunity to use multiple theories and practices in my day to day duties.

COMM: What is your advice to recent communication graduates?

OO: I urge you to be flexible when looking for jobs and careers. The area of communication allows you to function in multiple ways in the work force.

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Kell Delaney (MA ’12)

COMM: Where are you now, and what do you do?

KD: After receiving my MA in communication, I stumbled my way into a job in Boulder at Conversant, a company that teaches better conversation (it’s more than just skills and tools!) as the means to improve leadership, productivity, relationships and so on. I’ve held a variety of positions in the past two years, but my current title is product experience designer. Although I do many things, I am primarily tasked with helping to develop “products” (eLearning, worksheets, assessments, on-the-ground deliveries) in a way that considers the product experience first and foremost.

COMM: Can you recall a time when you thought about what you had learned about communication at CU?

KD: This happens on a daily basis. Although I do not work directly with communication theory, nor do I refer to it on a daily basis, the way that I was taught to think about how words, language, culture, gender, organizational culture, environment and so on, provides the foundation from which I work. For example, when managing a project, I no longer see myself as the “director” or sole “leader,” nor do I see a “right” or “wrong” way. Rather, the community of colleagues, vendors and clients who are involved or impacted by the project become crucial participants in an emergent and continuous conversation out of which a far better and often surprising result emerges.

COMM: What is your advice to recent communication graduates?

KD: There are many ways to have an impact and to apply what you have learned in the communication program. If research, teaching and the academic form of direct engagement in the field is what excites you, go for it. But, if you are open to using what you have learned in less explicit ways, there are many ways to do so. Communication is everywhere and pervades every aspect of our lives. One of the most valuable “skills” the communication program teaches is a depth of insight, awareness, and understanding of the world around us and the way that communication liberates and binds us. So, take that awareness and know that your communication background will help you make an impact in whatever way and whatever field you choose.

 

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Angie White Davlyn (PhD ’12)

COMM: Where are you now, and what do you do?

AWD: I direct the Western Colorado office (in Carbondale, Colo.) of JVA Consulting, a consulting firm that works with social change organizations such as nonprofits, foundations, and social enterprises. In this role, I wear many hats, including helping organizations build internal capacity (staff development and teambuilding); plan for the future (facilitating strategic planning sessions); generate funding (writing grants and training boards to raise money); work more effectively (improving organizational culture); and measure the impact of their programs (gathering data via focus groups and interviews and analyzing that data to understand outcomes and make recommendations). I love what I do, and feel very fulfilled that my work directly impacts issues such as poverty, access to health care, and early childhood education.

COMM: Can you recall a time when you thought about what you had learned about communication at CU?

AWD: Truly, I use what I learned about communication every single day, and think that communication is one of the most important skills for a social change leader! When I work with an organization that is struggling in some way (e.g., isn’t able to raise funds, gain participants, or make a measurable impact from its programs), I start asking communication-oriented questions: How is the communication between the board and the executive director? Is the community aware of the organization and its impact? Do staff feel valued and that they are engaged in meaningful work? These often lead me to uncover some of the underlying issues that can be improved to help an organization function better.

COMM: What is your advice to recent communication graduates?

AWD: It’s wild that we spend the vast majority of our lives at our jobs, and most likely see our coworkers more than our spouses and friends and children. Given that, it’s critical to actively seek enjoyment in your work. It’s great to “do what you love,” but perhaps even better to find ways to love what you do. Creating a love of your work is in your hands: build relationships with your coworkers, work hard on issues you believe in, seek out mentors, ask questions and be willing to learn, be an active volunteer for social good, and—whether you’re a taxi driver or taxidermist or teacher—find out what sparks your passions and find ways to incorporate those things into your everyday.

In addition, be brave! I don’t know many people who can confidently say “I’m completely in my element at work, all the time.” Trying new things can be nerve-wracking, but it’s also an opportunity to grow. I’m not much of a fan of working with people who repeatedly say “I don’t know what I’m doing!” or who resist taking action because of a fear of failure. When you’re up against something that scares you (a big presentation or impossible deadline), sometimes you just have to muster up your courage, take a deep breath, put a smile on your face and plunge in! Even if you belly-flop, you’ll likely have learned something about how to do it better next time.



Organizing for Flood Relief: Interview with PhD Student Ricardo Munoz


COMM: Could you talk about the creation of Boulder Relief Co. as an organization?

RM: It all happened incredibly fast. BFR started with a document my graduate student colleague Meghan Dunn started on Google Docs on September 12, 2014. This was an organizing practice of Occupy Sandy and she put this out early on the 12th at the height of the floods. She promoted the document on Facebook and Twitter. I shared it on Facebook on my page and on Occupy Boulder. Following up on a suggestion from Occupy Boulder I created the “Occupy Boulder Flood Relief” page on Facebook and started promoting it on the Occupy Boulder website. Meghan saw the page and promoted it on Twitter. I posted an announcement for a meeting on the 13th. The next morning Meghan had found someone willing to donate some space at Riverside which became our home for the day. Lots of people showed up. By then we had also dropped “Occupy” from the name and we became Boulder Flood Relief. We created the website BoulderFloodRelief.org. By September 16, someone donated more permanent office space and our operation was coordinating between volunteers and homeowners. By September 20 we had a nonprofit corporation called Boulder Relief Co. registered to hold money donations.

COMM: What kind of organization is BRC today?

RM: Volunteer activity died out by December, 2013. The BRC board still meets every few weeks since we still have decisions to make about using the money we collected and coordinating with the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group for future potential floods. But other than that, we are mostly just sustaining BRC in case we need to restart Boulder Flood Relief.

COMM: What kinds of unique communication issues have you and your colleagues encountered working for BRC?

RM: We had very little problem gaining legitimacy among the volunteer population in Boulder. Existing organizations like the CU Volunteer Office were happy to send us volunteers and very few people questioned our motives. This was both good and strange since in the first few weeks we had no shortage of volunteers, lots of money coming in from donations, and lots of people asking for help. It would have been easy for someone to see us as a scam. Of course we weren’t, and somehow people sensed that. I still find it a bit mysterious that people simply trusted us considering the lack of formal organizing or organizational history. We were really just a Facebook page, a Twitter feed, a website and donated office and storage space. We did have a nice logo inspired by Occupy Sandy. That may have helped, but it’s still a bit mysterious.


The other communication lesson here is that lots of coordination can happen informally once you organize horizontally. Decision-making was very informal and as close to the problem as possible, meaning no one had to report back to “head office” for instructions. Our meetings were also horizontal and mostly consistent with Occupy-style consensus process. This was difficult to process for some, including our volunteer lawyer who felt that unless we were using Robert’s Rules we weren’t being formal enough. But with so many Occupy people involved we couldn’t help but recreate structures we were familiar with. Without a formal structure we simply adapted to situations as they occurred.

Someone pointed out that we had missed lots of things that could have been done, but we also responded very quickly to any request for help. In hindsight, we probably would have been exposed to major litigation if something had gone wrong. Surprisingly, in spite of the largely ad hoc nature of our work only a few things went wrong. So maybe the lesson here is that sincere people don’t have to wait to get things done, and don’t need formal structures.

COMM: How do you see the future of BRC?

RM: Until another flood happens, our projects now include documenting what we accomplished. We have lots of knowledge now about creating a grassroots organization that may be worth sharing formally. We also want to keep cooperating with the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group in setting up long term resiliency plans. I’m not directly involved in any of the post-flood activities except maintaining the BRC board meeting schedule. I suppose the real answer to your question is, “whatever comes our way, we’ll deal with it!”

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Recent Graduate Student Accomplishments

Carey Candrian (PhD ’11) and James Fortney (PhD candidate) published a case study, “Will You Help Me? Navigating the Role of ‘Care’ in Ethnographic Fieldwork” in Sage Research Methods, 2013, doi:10.4135/978144627305013512922

PhD Candidate Elizabeth K. Eger presented her essay, “Competing and Conflicting Means and Ends of Transgender Work Justice,” at New York University for the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting in March. She also presented two research projects on girls and IT connected with her research assistantship at the National Center for Women and Information Technology at the Digital Media Learning Conference in Boston on a panel called, “Complexities and Contradictions – Examining Girls’ Participation in Digital Media Programs.”

James Fortney (PhD candidate) and Kate Harris (PhD ’13) presented a paper, “Reflexivity and Disclosure: Methodological Trends in Tension?” at the Qualitative Research in Management and Organizations Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Kate Harris (PhD ’13) published a book chapter with Professor Karen Ashcraft titled “‘Meaning that Matters’: An Organizational Communication Perspective on Gender, Discourse, and Materiality,” in S. Kumra, R. Simpson, & R. Burke (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Gender in Organizations (pp. 130–150), 2014, New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

PhD candidate Chris Ingraham received the Florence Husted Lowe and F. Rex Lowe Arts and Humanities Dissertation Fellowship for academic year 2014-15.

Jen Malkowski (PhD ’14) has accepted a visiting professorship at Wake Forest University for the academic year 2014-15.

PhD student Ricardo Munoz presented “The People’s Library as Memory and Resistance: Lieux de Mémoire of Occupy Wall Street,” which won the top graduate paper award at the Rocky Mountain Communication Association 2014 Annual Conference.

Allie Rowland (PhD ’14) accepted a faculty position in the Department of Performance and Communication Arts at St. Lawrence University, an outstanding liberal arts institution in Canton, NY. With Associate Professor Pete Simonson, she also published The Founding Mothers of Communication Research: Toward a History of a Gendered Assemblage” in Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2014, 3-26, doi:10.1080/15295036.2013.849355

Jennifer Ziegler (previously Thackaberry) (PhD ’00) is assuming the position of dean of the graduate school and continuing education at Valparaiso University, Indiana.

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Celebrating Elizabeth Nakang Achulo


Over decades of civil war tens of thousands of Sudanese children fled to a refugee camp in Kenya after their families were killed and their villages destroyed. They were known as “the lost boys and girls.” The girls often ended up being adopted by foster families from refugee camps. Many of them were beaten, raped and sold to rich older men for a bride-price.

Some of the girls were resettled in the United States with the help of volunteers and the State Department. Elizabeth Achulo was one of them. She arrived in Boulder in 2006. In May she graduated from the University of Colorado with a bachelor’s degree in communication. The television network Al-Jazeera America was present at her graduation and broadcast its coverage on local cable channels.

Congratulations from all of us, Elizabeth!

Read more about Elizabeth’s story hereWatch the trailer for the documentary film The Dawn Will Break about the Lost Girls of Sudan living in Boulder here.

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Introducing Eta Phi

By Joshua Chen, Eta Phi Vice President



Eta Phi
is the University of Colorado Boulder’s chapter of Lambda Pi Eta, the National Communication Association honor society. We seek to give our members opportunities to help make the communication major more than just an academic experience by connecting them to faculty and graduate students within the discipline and providing professional development and community service opportunities.

Undergraduates can become members if they participate in a required number of chapter meetings and service events each year. Students are able to be inducted if they have completed 60 semester hours with at least 12 of them being in communication, if they hold a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a 3.25 in Communication, and if they rank in the highest 35 percent of their class. We currently have 27 members, 15 of whom were inducted to the national organization in April.

Some of our service opportunities this year included involvement in Reading to End Racism, Little Kids Rock, TedX-CU, and most recently, hosting and orchestrating Hacking the Planet. Hacking the Planet is a new event conceived to empower our local community by inviting speakers to talk about their involvement in pertinent research in the sciences and pressing cultural issues, while encouraging others to take action themselves.

Our members are bright, motivated individuals who are passionate about communication. Our goal as an honor society is to generate valuable experiences outside of the classroom that will carry forward into graduate school, future careers and everyday interactions with peers and associates.

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Stay in touch!


We would love to hear your news! Answer the following three questions:

Where are you now (job, location), and what do you do?

Can you recall a time when you thought about what you had learned about communication at CU?

What is your advice to recent communication graduates?

Send your responses, and a picture of yourself, to comm.alum.news@colorado.edu .

 



Follow these links if you would like information about ways to help the department or want to make a contribution.

 


 

Newsletter created by David Boromisza-Habashi, Megan Winer and Elizabeth Drioane

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Department of Communication | University of Colorado Boulder
303-492-7306 | http://comm.colorado.edu/
270 UCB | Boulder, Colorado 80309